Welcome to Charlie Company

******************************************************

Welcome to Charlie Company website.  This site is dedicated to the fine men that served with Charlie Company 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division in Vietnam from 1966 to 1972.

******************************************************

4th badge

For information about our book ‘The Battle for Chu Moor Mountain Click Here

For more information of the 1st Battalion, Click on the About page.

SCROLL DOWN TO READ THE MOST RECENT POSTS

Down2

C Company, 1st /22nd, 4th Infantry Division, Vietnam, June – Nov, 1967

This video was filmed with 8mm home movie camera in the Central Highlands Vietnam. The exact dates and places unknown, film clips are in chronological order between approx Sept thru first of November 1967. For anyone in Charlie Company who was there I’m sure it will bring back memories. For anyone who has an interest, this is a first hand view of some of the stuff we did.

Filmed by Craig Nelson,
RTO (battalion freq) Hd Qtrs Platoon, Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, US Army June-Nov 1967

Dead American Soldiers in Vietnam

Describing his buddy Chip, Tim O’Brien wrote: “he wrote letters to my sister. I wrote letters to his sister…In the bush…nothing kept us part. “Black and White” we were called. In May of 1969, Chip was blown high into a hedge of bamboo. Many pieces. I loved the guy, he loved me. I’m alive. He’s dead. An old story, I guess.”

It was not unusual for half the men in a company to get killed or wounded. One soldier told the Washington Post, “A few months before leaving Vietnam I spent four hours of my life 50 feet from a North Vietnamese machine-gun emplacement…One fellow exposed himself to enemy gunners and drew their fire…Then came his screams…We knew we were watching the man who had given his life for us die.” Continue reading

Resuming the Mission After the Swift Boat Ambush

LTJG Peter N. Upton wrote: “First light of 13 April manifested typical magnificence; lacking, however, were contemplative spirits necessary for the breathing in of such grandeur. Following the sumptuousness of mawkish tomato juice and canned scrambled eggs, orders were barked and the perimeter troops reembarked in order to proceed with the days schedule of sweeps. The buzzing activity provided a well-needed elixir, forcing wretched visions of the previous day’s ambush into realms of temporary obscurity. Towards nightfall the sweeps terminated and the Marines formed protective enclaves for the night’s rest. The swiftboats, released from support duty, then formed the classic file and headed to sea and safety, retracing the path of the tragic twelfth.

“Short minutes after getting underway the boats passed the still-life remains of the 43, an aesthetic aberration suspended on the north bank of the Duong Keo, simply out of joint with her surroundings. Looking at her bow, bending towards the azure heavens in a searching gesture, one could almost feel motion, a groping for the malignancy which was the cause of her agonizing death. The uninitiated might further try to recreate the essence of the once pulsating holocaust which presently stood calmly before them. The vibrant sensations of that enormity-the anguish, the torments, the frustrations, and the ecstasy-however, will forever remain an esoteric fact, privy to the surviving fifteen: no effort of meditation could possibly reveal those secrets.